Awards Winners

2010

It is our great pleasure to announce the Technology Division of the American Planning Association (APA) Awards for 2010. This year we received some excellent submissions for our Award Program. Each one of these submissions was an example of how technology can help planning, and demonstrated how its use is integral to communication and engagement within the community. Our Award Committee comprised of elected members from the Division Leadership, and deliberated carefully to come to the following decisions:

Best Use of Technology to Improve a Plan or Planning Process

This category recognizes an organization for the creative use of technology in improving planning processes. Examples may include technology in subdivision approval, urban design, or comprehensive planning.

  • Marc Schlossberg's (University of Oregon) 'Engaging Citizens in Active Transportation Planning with Mobile GIS' for its creative use of technology in improving planning processes. (Category 1)

Best Use of Technology for Public Participation

This category recognizes an organization for the best use of technology to enhance public involvement and participation in planning and decision making processes.

  • Michael Baker Jr.'s 'More For 1604 Social Media Program' for its good use of technology to enhance public involvement and participation in planning and decision-making processes. (Category 2)

Best Use of Technology for a University Urban and Regional Planning Program

This category recognizes an accredited university planning program for the most effective use of teaching with technology in preparing future planners for professional work. This can include the work of a single class or the use of technology to benefit all students in the program.

  • The School of Policy Planning and Development's (University of Southern California) 'Multimedia Boot Camps' for its effective use of teaching with technology in preparing future planners for professional work. (Category 3)

2006

The APA Technology Division has created five awards that recognize the outstanding use of technology in planning. "This is the first time the division is granting awards. It is time that we recognize the outstanding work that our members are engaged in," said Ken Snyder, chair of the division.

"Even though this was our first call for award nominations, we received a tremendous response from the planning community. The jury had a challenging time selecting the best project in each category," noted Jennifer Evans-Cowley, AICP, division Vice-Chair. The winner of each award category is included below.

Best Use of Technology to Plan for Natural Disaster Prevention or Recovery

This category recognizes an organization for the use of technology for disaster prevention or recovery before a disaster occurs. Examples may include hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, or wildfires.

  • Mississippi Governor's Commission for Recovery, Rebuilding, and Renewal and the Congress for New Urbanism: Mississippi Renewal Forum: Following Hurricane Katrina, the Governor's Commission and CNU organized a six-day design charrette that included 400 participants to create regional growth vision and recovery plans for 11 cities on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. As part of this project, the nine-person technology team provided onsite GIS, CAD systems, digital photography, a website, and participant listserv to allow participants and outsiders to have access to critical information needed to develop plans for rebuilding. To learn more about this project visit www.mississippirenewal.com.

Best Use of Technology for Planning Analysis

This category recognizes an organization or individual for the creative use of technology to carry out in-depth planning analysis and planning forecasting methods.

  • Ada County, Idaho Highway District: Ada County Highway District Pedestrian and Bicycle Transition Plan: This project combined GIS, pocket PCs, and human manpower to conduct an assessment of 27,000 sidewalk segments, 19,000 street corners, and 1,000 miles of roadside without sidewalks in order to develop a bike and pedestrian facility plan for the county. To view the Pedestrian and Bicycle Transition Plan, visit www.achd.ada.id.us/Departments/ppce/ped-bike_plan.asp.

Best Use of Technology for Public Participation

This category recognizes an organization for the best use of technology to enhance public involvement to enhance public involvement and participation in planning and decision making processes.

  • City of Farmers Branch, Texas: E-planning Strategy: Farmer's Branch developed an e-planning strategy to develop interactive technology tools to make information accessible and encourage public participation. The Planning Division utilized websites, e-mail, digital convergence meetings, and online television to increase communication with the public. To learn more about the City of Farmer's Branch e-planning tools, visit www.ci.farmers-branch.tx.us/Planning/Planning.html.

Best Use of Technology for a University Urban and Regional Planning Program

This category recognizes an accredited university planning program for the most effective use of teaching with technology in preparing future planners for professional work. This can include the work of a single class or the use of technology to benefit all students in the program.

  • UC San Diego: Urban Studies and Planning Program Senior Sequence: This two-quarter senior sequence utilized a suite of internet-based tools and guides to help students maximize their educational research and workforce experience. Through a partnership with the San Diego Supercomputer Center students are able to use systems that improve research skills and allow them to become civically-engaged scholars in planning. To learn more about the research resources offered through UC San Diego visit, wwww.regionalworkbench.org.

Best Use of Technology to Improve a Plan or Planning Process

This category recognizes an organization for the creative use of technology in improving planning processes. Examples may include technology in subdivision approval, urban design, or comprehensive planning.

  • Northeast Illinois Planning Commission: Full Circle Community Mapping and Planning Project: NIPC is able to enhance local planning processes through better information provided through its Full Circle program. Participants in the Full Circle program are able to collect, update, display, extract, and analyze data at three spatial levels, including parcels, businesses within parcels, and blocks. To learn about the Full Circle Community Mapping and Planning Project, visit www.fulcir.net/FC/.