Obstacles/Opportunties in Implementing Green Infrastructure in Anchorage

APA Alaska Chapter

#9004625

Monday, November 16, 2015
9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m. AKST

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Overview

In 2014, the Watershed Management Services of the MOA established the Green Infrastructure Working Group, a collaboration professionals working in Anchorage which includes hydrologists, engineers, landscape architects and planners with the goal of promoting and implementing stormwater green infrastructure. The working group has been documenting green infrastructure projects and advocating its use in their professional work. This session will summarize the working group’s activities and showcase some of the more notable Green Infrastructure projects and how they fit into the cityscape.

 

The makeup of professionals of the Green Infrastructure working group illustrates that implementation of GI is not strictly and engineering function or landscape architecture function, rather it applies to a wide variety of disciplines and implementation should be considered at project conception to construction. The purpose is to more fully conceptualize how a project can incorporate GI; how GI can be included in land use, transportation and environmental planning; and which technical specialists to include on projects and what roll they can serve.

The session will also show unsuccessful projects or those that could function more efficiently with a better understanding of design factors. This will be a lessons-learned case study of what has worked in Anchorage, what hasn’t and projects that could work better. The session will include a policy component on how to require GI on projects without forcing its use in impractical situations.

 

Speakers

Joe Miller

Invited Speaker

In 2009, before the ink dried on Joe Miller’s Ph.D., he joined the Fire Tower team, where he would continue his groundbreaking work on keyed beams. Joe’s interest in timber framing grew from a project he took on with his father, rebuilding an ancestral barn in southern ... Read More