Urban Greenway Gaps – The Importance of Connected Greenways and Bicycle Routes in Urban Communities

APA Connecticut Chapter

#9160818

Thursday, October 25, 2018
1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT

CM | 0.75

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Overview

Millions of dollars have been invested in surburban and exurban rail trails that primarily serve recreational riders. In Hartford’s urban and near-urban communities, there are some neighborhoods that have up to 50% of households without a car. These communities do not have bike lanes or greenways connecting them safely to work, school, and other key destinations. The presentation will present these “mobility gaps” and discuss how they could be in part resolved by a focus on urban, and near-urban greenways and multi-use trail facilities.

Conversely, towns surrounding Hartford do not have safe multiuse trails or bike lanes that could connect them to the region’s job center. The lack of greenways, multiuse trails, and bike lane connectivity holds our entire region back. Resurgent cities and regions have growing active transportation mode share, and they have focused their investments on connected, safe bicycle networks.

 

 

 

  • LEARNING OBJECTIVES FOR THE SESSION - Participants will:
    • Visually review the gaps in bicycle facilities and multiuse trails in the metro Hartford region, specifically in West Hartford, Windsor, Hartford, Bloomfield, Wethersfield, Newington, and East Hartford.
    • Review the funding mechanisms used for greenways and bicycle lanes, and how those could be adjusted to better serve high housing density, high destination density, and low car ownership neighborhoods.
    • Review bicycle and pedestrian crash data in urban areas to highlight the need for urban multi-use trails, connected bicycle route networks, and greenways.
    • Examine bicycle routes Hartford (regional job center) into neighboring towns, and identify the disconnects and lack of bike lanes, Greenways, and multiuse trails. The lack of connections and safety concerns of “middle of the road” bike riders reduce bicycle commute mode share. Connecticut’s bike to work mode share is ~0.6% and that is beyond tragic.

 

Speakers

Tony Cherolis

Company: Center for Latino Progress Title: Program Manager Town where I live: Hartford Town where I work: Hartford College: Florida State University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Fun Fact: I built and sledded on creations in all five Hartford Art Sled Derbies, and last year broke my collar bone. Q&A: What ... Read More

Contact Info

Tony Cherolis, tony_cherolis@ctprf.org