Mountain Town and Resort Planning Summit

APA Idaho

#9118946

Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 1 p.m.
Friday, March 31, 2017, 4 p.m. MDT

Jackson , WY, United States

Overview

The summit is a small and interactive conference, where ideas, questions and responses flow freely among participants, facilitators, and the host communities. The Canadian and American past attendees found that the connections made at the conference have been extremely helpful to find solutions in day to day challenges, create a network of professionals from similar communities, and encourage big picture thinking. The majority of the summit is spent in roundtable discussions with peers to share ideas and best practices, led by expert facilitators. 

Mountain Town jurisdictions have some unique planning issues. Through  four lectures on Balancing Nature/Commerce, Mountain Town Profile/Challenge, Overplatted, and Small Town Conundrum, and eight roundtables on Transportation, Sustainability, Resilience/Climate Change, Leadership, Land Use Coding, Economic Development, and Housing the summit will provide attendees with the best available science, technology, leadership tools, amd best practices to address these uniquely resort community issues. 

Most of thes ecommunities lie within some of the planet’s most precious and sensitive ecosystems. Preserving natural resources and wildlife habitat is not only a challenge in shaping appropriate development patterns, but preserving the unique qualities that draw residents and visitors to these communities in the first place. Natural resource protection often involves a patchwork of federal, state, and local regulations, and profoundly affects a wide variety of stakeholders. Attendees will share their experiences in their respective communities, discuss regulatory approaches to natural resource conservation, and learn about regional, national, and international efforts to preserve the environment.

Mountain town and resort community planners are faced with transportation issues that are both voluminous and complex. Moving tourists, transporting workers, developing context sensitive solutions, promoting transit oriented development, and managing transportation demand require intelligent transportation systems to serve mountain town and resort environments. 

Mountain town and resort communities are at the forefront of sustainability. Sustainable communities seek to:

●      Provide more transportation choices. Develop safe, reliable, and economical transportation choices to decrease household transportation costs, reduce our nation’s dependence on foreign oil, improve air quality, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and promote public health.

●      Promote equitable, affordable housing. Expand location- and energy-efficient housing choices for people of all ages, incomes, races, and ethnicities to increase mobility and lower the combined cost of housing and transportation.

●      Enhance economic competitiveness. Improve economic competitiveness through reliable and timely access to employment centers, educational opportunities, services and other basic needs by workers, as well as expanded business access to markets.

●      Support existing communities. Target funding toward existing communities—through strategies like transit oriented, mixed-use development, and land recycling—to increase community revitalization and the efficiency of public works investments and safeguard rural landscapes.

●      Coordinate and leverage policies and investment. Align policies and funding to remove barriers to collaboration, leverage funding, and increase the accountability and effectiveness of all levels of government to plan for future growth, including making smart energy choices such as locally generated renewable energy

●      Value communities and neighborhoods. Enhance the unique characteristics of all communities by investing in healthy, safe, and walkable neighborhoods—rural, urban, or suburban.

Mountain town and resort community planners are faced with unique situations with regard to resilience and enduring the results of climate change. Many communities are in and/or adjacent to environmentally sensitive spaces prone to wildfire, flooding, and other weather related events. The economies of amenity communities – vacation destinations, second home communities, etc. – rely upon a natural environment continually under threat from climate change. 

Western communities - mountain towns in particular - have been particularly susceptible to boom-bust real estate cycles. This has often led to the empty or partially development that exceed long-term demand, adversely impact the environment, fall into disrepair, or are otherwise inconsistent with community objectives. Mountain town and resort community planners are faced with unique situations in managing land use through the administration of development codes/bylaws. Communities and their stakeholders are increasingly in need of codes/bylaws that are technically sound but understandable to the public. Consultant selection and project scoping are also challenges. 

Mountain town and resort community planners are faced with unique seasonal economies. Economic Development in mountain towns includes much more than business retention and business recruitment. Attendees will learn about different economic development strategies from varies communities and tools for encouraging economic development. Though most mountain resort communities are reliant upon a tourist economy, North Americans are increasingly fleeing cities in order to enjoy the quality of life afforded by mountain towns. Yet without savvy planning, gateway communities could easily meet the same fate as the suburban communities that were the promised land of an earlier generation  The event will provide practical and proven lessons on how residents of mountain resort communities can protect their community's identity while stimulating a healthy economy and safeguarding nearby natural and historic resources. Topics discussed include economic development strategies, land-use planning processes, conservation tools, as well as case studies on how peer communities have successfully implemented these tools. Participants will learn how to use these tools, thereby allowing them to protect the character and integrity of communities and landscapes without sacrificing local economic well-being. 

Mountain town and resort communities acutely affected by a shortage of workforce housing. Attendees will learn: 

 

●      How to develop effective housing policies. Attendees will learn about successes and lessons learned from their respective communities, and the facilitator will provide guidance on policy frameworks in use throughout the industry.

●      Promote equitable, affordable housing. Expand location- and energy-efficient housing choices for people of all ages, incomes, races, and ethnicities to increase mobility and lower the combined cost of housing and transportation.

●      Identify funding strategies. Attendees will be led by the facilitator about possible funding opportunities and strategies that can be developed for specific housing issues.

 

●      Support existing communities. Target funding toward existing communities—through strategies like transit oriented, mixed-use development, and land recycling—to increase community revitalization and the efficiency of public works investments and safeguard rural landscapes.

 

 

 

Contact Info

Shawn Hill, shawn@tetonvalleyadvocates.org

Activities