• Jun 21, 09:05 AM | Philly.com

    Burlington City's Waterfront to Sparkle Decades After Land Was Cleared of Rowhouses, Factories

    June 21--Claudine Conaway vividly remembers growing up and raising a family in a Burlington City rowhouse by the Delaware River, only to be forced out with her neighbors -- more than 100 African American families -- to make way for urban renewal more than 40 years ago. "We were the last house standing," said Conaway, recalling how the city initially offered $10,000 for their three-story, ...

  • Jun 21, 09:32 AM | Los Angeles Times

    Members Only Its Design Has Been Scorned, But L.A. Live Has Been Crucial to Downtown's Resurgence

    June 21--When the NBA All-Star Weekend returned to Los Angeles in February for the third time since 2004, it was no lucky fluke for the city. It's a running joke in the basketball league, Commissioner Adam Silver said, that if team owners can't have the annual showcase in their own cities, they want to have it at Staples Center and the adjacent L.A. Live complex in downtown L.A. "The team ...

  • Jun 21, 06:03 AM | The Rapid City Journal

    Many Factors Contribute to Local Affordable Housing Shortage

    A variety of factors contribute to Rapid City's shortage of affordable housing. They include a shortage of high-income housing, wage stagnation, growing demand for single-person homes, and an overdependence on tourism. A 95-page report released Tuesday morning by Jared McEntaffer, Ph.D., economist and director of the Black Hills Knowledge Network, demonstrates the local need for affordable ...

  • Jun 21, 08:16 AM | San Francisco Examiner

    How to Combat San Francisco's Affordable Housing Crisis

    The San Francisco Planning Department is under pressure from all sides to develop more affordable housing and to improve the efficiency of San Francisco's planning process. Critics in search of answers to what has caused the city's affordable housing crisis have started to point to the entire entitlement process as a leading cause of why housing prices are so high while supply remains so low.

  • Jun 21, 05:55 AM | Monterey County Weekly

    Critics question lack of transparency in public-private economic development groups

    Recent actions by a quasi-public state economic development corporation in Delaware have raised new concerns about the approach of public-private groups, which often lack transparency in how taxpayers dollar are being used. The Delaware Prosperity Partnership (DPP) recently hired a chief executive officer and helped research company Adesis obtain a $445,000 state taxpayer grant. Both incidents ...

  • Jun 21, 02:34 AM | Guardian Web

    Spite buildings: when human grudges get architectural – in pictures

    “Spite buildings” are constructions specifically intended to irritate or protest: our smallest human pettiness made manifest in bricks, mortar and a reckless disregard for planning laws. Their origins are often disputed, occasionally embellished and usually entertaining, revealing tales of spurned lovers, fraternal feuds and vengeance. Below we highlight a few of the most famous of these ...

  • Jun 20, 10:32 PM | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

    Task force formed to develop St. Louis County affordable housing fund plan

    June 20--A task force will spend the next several months examining how to form, run and pay for an affordable housing trust fund in St. Louis County. An 18-member task force, which Beyond Housing CEO and task force co-chair Chris Krehmeyer called a "virtual all-star team" of community development and affordable housing professionals, will meet monthly and submit its recommendations to the St. ...

  • Jun 20, 09:48 PM | Foster's Daily Democrat

    Net metering veto dims Dover's solar hopes

    June 21--DOVER -- Gov. Chris Sununu's veto of a bill that would expand the cap for net-metering is likely to impact Dover's vision of installing a large-scale solar project at its Tolend Road landfill. Sununu, a Republican, vetoed SB 446 on Tuesday, saying the bill "would cost ratepayers at least $5 to $10 million annually and is a large handout to large-scale energy developers." SB 446 sought ...

  • Jun 20, 09:42 PM | Philly.com

    'Bike Montco' initiative envisions 800 miles of new bike paths in suburbia

    June 21--Officials in Montgomery County on Wednesday unveiled the early drafts of a plan that would bring nearly 800 miles of bike paths to the area's suburban landscape. "We're still a car-oriented culture and a car-oriented county, but things are changing," said Matthew Edmond, the head of transportation planning for the county's Planning Commission. "We've had enthusiastic support in ...

  • Jun 20, 09:17 PM | Journal Star

    Wayfinding finds a way in Peoria

    June 21--PEORIA -- Wayfinding has found its way to Peoria. That's the science -- or art -- of helping people navigate their way through a downtown or hospital, as the case may be. Thanks to a grant from the Tri-County Regional Planning Commission, the city has contracted Corbin Design, a firm based in Traverse City, Mich., to fashion a wayfinding plan. Nick Stoffer, the city's traffic ...

  • Jun 20, 08:00 PM | The Boston Globe

    Members Only CLF plans suit to overturn new zoning that allows skyscrapers on harbor’s edge

    A major environmental group said Wednesday that it will sue to overturn a new zoning plan for Boston’s downtown waterfront, creating yet another hurdle for a long-planned skyscraper on the site of the Boston Harbor Garage. The Conservation Law Foundation filed notice that it will challenge the plan in court, saying that it violates state law by giving developers the right to build too much ...

  • Jun 20, 07:48 PM | The Anniston Star

    Goal: Not just jobs, but good-paying jobs

    June 20--Oxford leaders in 2016 gave the flooring manufacturer Kronospan a tax abatement for a $300 million expansion that the company estimated would create 160 jobs. Earlier this month, the Oxford City Council amended that abatement -- it turns out the expansion grew to $400 million and will likely create more than 300 jobs. Good economic news has become common in Alabama, as the state ...

  • Jun 20, 06:56 PM | Chicago Tribune

    Amid Balbo doubts, supporter says Lake Shore Drive, other streets could work to honor Ida B. Wells

    June 20--A City Council backer of renaming Balbo Drive downtown to honor Ida B. Wells-Barnett expressed dismay the controversial plan didn't get a public hearing Wednesday, but said another Chicago street such as Lake Shore Drive could instead get christened for the crusading African-American journalist and anti-lynching activist. South Side Ald. Sophia King said after the hearing on her plan ...

  • Jun 20, 06:18 PM | Herald-Sun

    He voted for the project and now works for its developer. City Council has questions

    June 20--DURHAM -- City Council members expressed concern this week that an attorney who serves on an advisory board now represents a developer whose project he voted on two months ago. Nil Ghosh, who works for Morningstar Law Group, serves on the Durham City-County Planning Commission. On Monday night he spoke at a City Council meeting in favor of the proposed Rollingdale townhouse ...

  • Jun 20, 05:33 PM | Northwest Florida Daily News

    Affordable housing a 'major crisis' in Okaloosa County

    June 20--FORT WALTON BEACH -- When Jim Cordes settled into his apartment at Hurlburt Arms on Forsman Circle two years ago, he thought he had found his home. "I was living in another apartment before this, but it wasn't as nice," he said. Cordes has been with an Independent Living Program through Bridgeway Center for six years. Before that he jumped from couch to couch and job to job, and even ...

  • Jun 20, 03:48 PM | New York Times Online

    Members Only New York City Sues Landlords Who Refuse Government Vouchers

    For the past four years, New York City has tried to persuade landlords and real estate brokers to rent apartments to low-income people and homeless people with bonuses and pledges that rent would be guaranteed with government vouchers. The incentives have helped thousands of people move into permanent housing throughout the city. But some landlords have still refused to accept vouchers, city ...

  • Jun 20, 01:07 PM | Baltimore Sun

    People are recycling too much garbage, experts say -- and it's threatening the economics of the industry

    June 20--When Marylanders first started tossing recyclables into the blue bin and setting it out by the curb about a decade ago, only a small percentage of the material ended up in a landfill or incinerator. Now, as much as a third of it gets trashed. Local governments once made money selling off paper, bottles and cans. But this year many around the Baltimore region have started spending ...

  • Jun 20, 12:21 PM | Associated Press

    Puerto Rico gov signs bill to privatize power company assets

    SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rico's governor signed a historic bill Wednesday to privatize the U.S. territory's troubled power company in a move many hope will help minimize power outages that have followed Hurricane Maria and stabilize the production and distribution of energy amid an 11-year-old recession. The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority is one of the largest U.S. public ...

  • Jun 20, 05:13 PM | The Plain Dealer

    Members Only ‘Go to Cleveland, young ones,' is planning professor's advice

    Malo Hutson teaches city planning at Columbia University in New York, but when his students complain about the high cost of living there, he tells them to go to Cleveland to seek opportunity and a better life. "I mean that in a real way," Hutson said Friday during a public dialogue at the City Club of Cleveland, "Go to Cleveland, get involved. Make an impact." Hutson, who specializes in how ...

  • Jun 20, 08:35 AM | Detroit Free Press

    Ford Revels in a New 'City of Possibility'; Residents Hopeful, Skeptical

    June 20--As Ford Motor Co. celebrated its return to Detroit with dignitaries and grand plans for the new economy and the future of transportation at Michigan Central Station in Corktown, Alondra Alvarez worried. She slipped into the train station during a media huddle Tuesday and approached Bill Ford, the great-grandson of Henry Ford, American industrial royalty. She had a question. Alvarez, ...

  • Jun 20, 08:48 AM | The Advocate

    Proposed Baton Rouge-New Orleans Rail Service Includes Greenscapes, Development

    June 20--A few dozen Baton Rouge residents on Tuesday got a first look at what rail stations for a long-discussed passenger rail service to New Orleans might look like, as a consulting firm unveiled preliminary concepts for Baton Rouge locations downtown and in the suburban health district. The plans detail the ambitious multi-use developments surrounding the proposed rail stations, calling ...

  • Jun 20, 05:34 AM | Baltimore Sun

    Plummeting Value of Paper and Glass Raise Concerns About 'a New Reality of Recycling'

    June 20--When Marylanders first started tossing recyclables into the blue bin and setting it out by the curb about a decade ago, only a small percentage of the material ended up in a landfill or incinerator. Now, as much as a third of it gets trashed. Local governments once made money selling off paper, bottles and cans. But this year many around the Baltimore region have started spending ...

  • Jun 20, 09:06 AM | Houston Chronicle

    Members Only Fears mount as rumors spread that Kirby Mansion close to sold

    June 20--The future of the Kirby Mansion, a 1920s English-style manor on the cusp of downtown, is in peril as a buyer seeks to purchase the historic property, according to people familiar with the sale. Preservationists fear the two-story red brick estate at 2000 Smith, developed just before the Great Depression, could become the latest of the city's dwindling supply of historic and ...

  • Jun 20, 08:32 AM | Decatur Daily

    Planning Commission agrees on proposed changes to food/alcohol ratio

    June 20--Decatur Planning Commission members unanimously agreed Tuesday the city should change the food/alcohol ratio for restaurants from 60 percent food/40 percent alcohol to 51 percent food/49 percent alcohol. Chuck Ard, the City Council liaison to the commission, asked if the city is losing or gaining business with the issue of the food-alcohol ratio. City Planner Karen Smith said at least ...

  • Jun 20, 08:12 AM | Lake County News

    Three Caltrans Projects honored in national transportation competition

    SACRAMENTO – Three Caltrans projects received top honors this week from the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials', or AASHTO, Western Region. The 11th annual America's Transportation Awards competition, sponsored by AASHTO, Socrata, AAA, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, recognizes transportation projects in three categories: Quality of Life/Community Development, ...

  • Jun 20, 07:46 AM | Tribune-Democrat

    Wolf signs anti-blight laws aimed at reducing time, costs to bring down eyesores

    June 20--WINDBER -- Since becoming Windber's borough manager in 2016, Jim Furmanchik has kept a list of his hometown's most dilapidated properties in his office. Whittling away at it has become a priority, recently allowing the community to brighten up a rundown gas station property in the heart of the downtown. But even with council dedicating more time -- and money -- toward the issue, the ...

  • Jun 20, 04:06 AM | Chattanooga Times Free Press

    Public calls for freeze on water fees

    June 20--Public input on a planned hike in water quality fees Tuesday night focused a good bit on the "input" part. Several Chattanooga residents at a City Council public hearing complained that comments taken after the plan was adopted and put into the 2019 budget isn't really public participation. "The work was all done behind closed doors without public input," said Sandy Kurtz, with the ...

  • Jun 20, 03:40 AM | San Francisco Chronicle

    Members Only Citing racist ties,Phelan Avenuerenamed by supes

    Phelan Avenue, a short stretch of roadway lining the west side of City College of San Francisco's Ocean Campus, will be rechristened as Frida Kahlo Way following a unanimous vote by the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday. The street extends for less than half a mile from Ocean Avenue north to Flood Avenue in the Ingleside neighborhood. It was named after James Phelan, a 19th century real estate ...

  • Jun 20, 03:30 AM | Herald-Times

    Past returns on city tax abatements may shift focus to affordable housing

    June 20--Job growth and capital investment have previously been the driving forces behind whether a company would benefit from tax forgiveness. That approach is changing as city officials think modern affordable housing needs may have a stronger influence on what kind of projects receive the economic incentive tool in the future. "The way you've seen tax abatements used recently and the way ...

  • Jun 20, 03:03 AM | Telegram & Gazette

    Idea pitched to save Notre Dame shell in the manner of West Boylston's Old Stone Church

    June 20--WORCESTER -- Advocates desperately fighting to save the former Notre Dame des Canadiens Church from demolition have broached an idea they feel could turn the historic structure into a centerpiece for the city, at a cost they claim would be far less than preserving and redeveloping the entire building. They have suggested that only the outer shell of the building be preserved, much ...

  • Jun 20, 12:00 AM | Associated Press

    Members Only Historic designation sought for Oklahoma City Freedom Center

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Marilyn Luper Hildreth says it is fitting that Oklahoma City recognize the role played by the former Mobil filling station at NE 25 and MLK in the fight for civil rights. An advisory commission has recommended the Freedom Center be designated a historic landmark. The building was home base for the NAACP Youth Council and headquarters for activists who fought housing ...

  • Jun 19, 10:15 PM | Miami Herald

    Roadblock for Miami-Dade parkway plan? Feds own big chunks of wetlands along the route

    June 20--When Miami-Dade County commissioners vote Wednesday on whether to allow the Dolphin Expressway to snake across wetlands where the federal government has bought large tracts as part of Everglades protection plans, one question remains unclear: whether the federal government will agree to surrender the land. Over decades of trying to fix the Everglades, the Department of Interior has ...

  • Jun 19, 10:23 PM | The Herald-Tribune

    Latest Sarasota bayfront design to be shared at public forums

    June 20--The Sarasota Bayfront Planning Organization and its master design and planning firm, Sasaki, will host four large presentations for the community next week to show the latest master plan for the Sarasota bayfront redevelopment project known as The Bay. The revised plan is based on the continued synthesis of community feedback, various community meetings and other input gathered via ...

  • Jun 19, 09:52 PM | Orlando Sentinel

    Brightline high-speed passenger train gets Orange County OK to lay tracks in wetlands

    June 20--After winning approval Tuesday from Orange County commissioners, the company planning a high-speed passenger train linking Orlando with Miami expects to start laying rail in Central Florida later this year, a project executive said. The 235-mile rail service includes a 22-mile stretch through Orange County that runs parallel to State Road 528 beginning at the St. Johns River and ...

  • Jun 19, 09:52 PM | Orlando Sentinel

    Orange County limits pawn shops, payday loan centers and gun shops in Pine Hills

    June 20--Reacting to pleas from community leaders, Orange County commissioners approved new rules for parts of Pine Hills -- including its proposed town center -- that will forbid new pawn shops, payday loan centers and gun shops. The enterprises are among business uses deemed to be "over-represented or undesirable" along Silver Star and Pine Hills roads, said Michelle Owens, executive ...

  • Jun 19, 08:15 PM | Detroit Free Press

    Detroit's comeback focus of History network special

    June 19--What's a huge party without some home movies? A History network special on Detroit's revival was announced Tuesday during Ford's public celebration of buying Michigan Central Station. A one-hour special titled "Detroit: Comeback City" was announced by Ford CEO Jim Hackett during the festivities attended by thousands, who got to see a trailer for the documentary. The film is scheduled ...

  • Jun 19, 07:09 PM | Akron Beacon Journal

    Akron is opposing a top-rated business in the medical marijuana industry

    June 20--Akron is fighting one of only three locations where patients can soon buy medical marijuana in Summit County. City Planner Jason Segedy and Zoning Manager Mike Antenucci told the Planning Commission last week that a "highly secure and unobtrusive" dispensary at 46 S. Summit St. "falls short of the land use characteristics expected within the Downtown Arts District and Northside ...

  • Jun 19, 06:19 PM | The Advocate

    Planners to unveil proposed Baton Rouge rail stations for passenger service to New Orleans tonight

    June 19--Planners in charge of the long-discussed Baton Rouge-New Orleans passenger rail service will unveil conceptual designs for the two rail stations in the Capital City Tuesday evening at a public meeting designed to gain input and provide and update on the project. The East Baton Rouge Redevelopment Authority and HNTB, the consulting firm hired to explore the rail service project, will ...

  • Jun 19, 06:00 PM | Government Executive

    Members Only HUD Moves to Evict Union from Federal Office Space

    Officials at the Housing and Urban Development Department told federal employee unions last week that they must vacate government-provided office space by mid-July, a move that union officials say is an attempt to undermine collective bargaining negotiations. On June 14, the department issued a notice to the American Federation of Government Employees Council 222, which represents HUD ...

  • Jun 19, 05:21 PM | The Washington Post

    Members Only They won the right to move their restaurant to a new location. But they ran out of money.

    By the time they won the legal battle, they were out of cash. The owners of a French restaurant in Alexandria fought residents for nearly four years in an effort to move their business to one of the busiest streets in town. Margaret Ticer Janowsky and Laurent Janowsky, owners of La Bergerie, said they lost $400,000 and outside investors while they battled for permission to relocate to a ...

  • Jun 19, 02:47 PM | Birmingham News

    Members Only Concerns linger about ‘poop trains’

    The last of the so-called “poop trains” once parked in western Jefferson County may have cleared the tracks in April, but many who live in the area are concerned they have not seen — or smelled — the last shipments of partially processed human waste heading for Big Sky landfill. Tammi Taylor, an Adamsville resident who organized a town hall meeting that late last week drew 100 people, said the ...

  • Jun 19, 02:28 PM | Associated Press

    Members Only Residents scrutinize Alamo redevelopment plan at hearing

    SAN ANTONIO (AP) — A $450 million plan to redevelop the Alamo has drawn criticism from many Texas residents at a recent public hearing. Several residents voiced opposition to relocating a 60-foot (18-meter) monument, demolishing buildings or closing streets at a public meeting Monday, the San Antonio Express-News reported. "We're already in the first minute on our conversation, and I'm already ...

  • Jun 19, 01:26 PM | Post-Bulletin

    Can city staff adjustment boost economic development efforts?

    June 19--Rochester's city administrator received a tentative nod for more discussion on a proposal to realign staff to address economic growth and community investment. "I'm not opposed," Rochester City Council Randy Staver said. "I'm just not ready to commit yet." Staver said he wants more information after hearing Monday's presentation, which included the potential to create a city ...

  • Jun 19, 12:15 PM | The Daily News

    Old adversaries protect forests, logging at volcano

    The top of Mount St. Helens was obscured by clouds on a late May afternoon when a conservationist and a timber company executive admired the view from the McClellan viewpoint, along Curly Creek Road in Skamania County. No problem. They weren't there to see the snowy summit. They were there to see the forested hills below the rim, which stood out clearly. So, now, does the future of those ...

  • Jun 19, 12:02 PM | Buffalo News

    Developers of student housing on Main eyed Buffalo for five years

    June 19--The student-housing developers behind a new planned project at Main Street and Hertel Avenue have been eyeing Buffalo for more than five years because, they say, it's been underserved by outside companies and much of what exists right now is not good quality. David Freeman, owner of Provo, Utah-based DFFusion Investments, said there's a need for better residential options in the city, ...

  • Jun 19, 11:02 AM | Register-Guard

    Eugene to allow residents rare access to Eugene riverfront property on Wednesday

    June 19--Residents on Wednesday evening will have a rare chance to walk on Eugene's fenced-off downtown riverfront property during an event that also will seek their opinions about how the site should be redeveloped. The open house will occur ahead of a June 25 City Council public hearing on the proposed terms of a development agreement between the city and Portland-based Williams/Dame & ...

  • Jun 19, 10:49 AM | Billings Gazette

    As nearby communities have improved event-hosting capabilities, Billings should too, presenter tells city council

    June 19--Comparable cities in the region have ramped up their convention- and events-hosting capabilities, a key factor why the Billings Chamber of Commerce and other advocates believe Billings needs a new facility downtown. Chamber President and CEO John Brewer made his case Monday during a city council work session. He said all of Billings' strategic partners have signed off on a development ...

  • Jun 19, 05:53 AM | The Huffington Post

    Members Only 6 Reasons Housing Is About To Become Even More Unaffordable

    By nearly every measure, the American housing sector is broken. For decades, city, state and federal policies have contributed to rising rents, falling subsidies and the systematic shift of homeownership to older, richer and whiter Americans. That’s the undeniable upshot of a new report from the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University. The report compiles hundreds of metrics on ...

  • Jun 19, 02:15 AM | Forbes

    Members Only London's Startup Tower: How The City Of London Is Swapping Grey Suits For Hipsters And High-Rises

    Twentytwo (center) is among the wave of developments hoping to lure tech-savvy talent to the heart of London. The heart of London has long had an image problem.Its financial powerhouse is powered every day by thousands of dark-suited workers at the capital’s most prestigious financial institutions, the Bank of England, Lloyds Banking Group and Standard Chartered to name but a few. Hipsters ...

  • Jun 18, 01:52 PM | National Real Estate Investor

    Retail Center Owners Look to Hotels to Bring New Life to Vacant Big-Box Spaces

    Owners and operators of hotels and retail centers are increasingly partnering up in an effort to help drive traffic to retail properties and create more pedestrian-friendly developments. It’s a trend that has arisen amid continuing headwinds facing retail real estate, a sector that has long seen challenges from the growth of e-commerce and changing consumer behaviors. To curtail the effects of ...

  • Jun 19, 08:33 AM | Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal

    Historic Downtown overlay district faces final vote

    June 19--TUPELO -- The City Council is expected to take action tonight imposing stricter design standards for residential structures in a historic neighborhood located downtown. The Tupelo Planning Committee has already approved the creation of an overlay district encompassing much of the area bounded by Jefferson Street, Robins Street, Jackson Street and Church Street. Some blocks on Green ...

  • Jun 19, 05:16 AM | Santa Cruz Sentinel

    New Santa Cruz County grant programs target youth homelessness

    June 19--SANTA CRUZ -- New resources soon will come on online for a population of the region's housing crisis often left in the shadows: the nearly 600 estimated Santa Cruz County unaccompanied homeless children and young adults. Pending final approval and funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in October, service providers are planning to create homeless ...

  • Jun 18, 11:34 PM | Beaver County Times

    Bill helps redevelopment authorities tackle blighted properties

    June 18--A bill that would give redevelopment authorities the ability to better address blighted properties in Pennsylvania communities is on Gov. Tom Wolf's desk. Senate Bill 667, sponsored by state Sen. Pat Stefano, R-Fayette County, initially passed the Senate in July 2017 before being amended and unanimously passed in the House on June 6. The Senate unanimously passed the amended version a ...

  • Jun 18, 09:48 PM | Herald Democrat

    Sherman directs CDBG funds toward parks, demolitions

    June 18--Sherman officials said the change of focus for its Community Development Block Grant funds is an effort to move from making a neighborhood impact to a community impact. After the Sherman City Council approved the action plan for the CDBG Program funds for publication earlier this month, Assistant City Manager Steve Ayers gave a more detailed discussion of how the funds would be ...

  • Jun 18, 08:11 PM | Baltimore Sun

    Rebuild or relocate? Here's what Ellicott City businesses are planning after second flood in two years

    June 18--Ellicott City's historic district has long been a shopping and dining destination. But after the second major flood in two years, business owners are facing the difficult question of whether to rebuild -- again. The town, founded in 1772, was devastated by flash flooding in 2016, but many business owners operated under a common goal of restoring their businesses and the town to glory. ...

  • Jun 18, 06:56 PM | Chicago Tribune

    Emanuel: Amazon 'really likes' two Chicago sites

    June 18--Amazon officials "really like" two of the five Chicago sites they toured earlier this year while scouting potential locations for a new headquarters, Mayor Rahm Emanuel said Monday. The mayor is trying to play things close to his vest so as not to anger Amazon as he and mayors across the U.S. wait for the company to conclude its lengthy, secretive process to decide where to locate its ...

  • Jun 18, 06:23 PM | The Daily Star

    Greener, greater cities; a callfor effective action

    What should a “green” city look like? Should it resemble Copenhagen, with its high rates of bicycle commuting and recycling? What about Curitiba, the capital of Brazil’s Parana state, with its pedestrian-centered planning? Or perhaps Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, which is powered entirely by renewable energy? With more than 50 percent of the world’s population now living in urban areas – a ...

  • Jun 18, 05:54 PM | Dallas Morning News

    Members Only How a strip mall parking lot could become a park in Far North Dallas

    June 18--City Hall hopes a little green will spruce up an old shopping center in Far North Dallas. The City Council's Economic Development and Housing Committee on Monday met in a closed-door executive session to discuss plowing millions in bond money to revitalize Hillcrest Village, a shopping center on the corner of Arapaho and Hillcrest roads. The city plans to partner on the project with ...

  • Jun 18, 02:04 PM | Sacramento Bee

    California Influencers: What can be done to make housing less expensive?

    June 18--Our readers are telling us housing affordability is a top concern for them. We asked the California Influencers to discuss what can be done to make housing less expensive in California. Mike Madrid, Principal of Grassroots Lab All policy proposals to address this problem are insufficient without one critical element -- a dramatic increase in supply at all levels. Jon Coupal, President ...

  • Jun 18, 01:50 PM | AM New York

    Ben Carson to visit NYCHA developments after city agrees to federal monitor

    June 18--Ben Carson, the secretary of Housing and Urban Development, is expected to visit NYCHA housing developments within the next month, the agency's regional director said on Monday. The news of the visit comes as about 100 housing authority residents gathered Monday in a Brooklyn community center for an emergency town hall meeting, hoping to understand the agreement between the city and ...

  • Jun 18, 12:50 PM | Bristol Herald Courier

    City looks to fill economic development director's job

    BRISTOL, Va. - Advertisements began appearing last week for a full-time economic development director in Bristol, Virginia. The position offers an annual salary ranging between $56,000 and nearly $80,000. City officials are currently creating materials to market the city and promote the advantages of locating a business here. "When we hire this economic development person, we'll have the tools ...

  • Jun 18, 11:33 AM | Associated Press

    Members Only Wichita leaders eye changes following economic analysis

    WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Community leaders are on a mission to improve Wichita after new figures indicate that the city's economy is struggling. Analyst and Wichita native James Chung presented an analysis of the city's economy to community leaders last week. The Wichita Community Foundation hired Chung three years ago to look at the city's strengths, problems and potential, the Wichita Eagle ...

  • Jun 18, 08:48 AM | The Advocate

    'Everything's negotiable': Proposed tax breaks raise questions as bid to build hotel near Morial center continues

    June 18--Ernest N. Morial Convention Center officials are back at the negotiating table, hoping to finally realize their dream of building a high-rise anchor hotel and, in time, a retail and entertainment complex on a vacant 47-acre tract the center purchased nearly two decades ago. But as they do so, they are having to deal with questions about the scores of millions of dollars in tax breaks ...

  • Jun 18, 09:34 AM | Bellingham Herald

    Short-Term Rentals Latest Bellingham Housing Controversy

    June 18--Short-term housing -- private rentals such as those offered through the online lodging service Airbnb -- could be regulated for the first time as Bellingham officials catch up to the digital economy. But the issue is facing opposition as the city wrestles with a persistent housing crisis. Some residents say short-term rentals take income from hotels, motels and workers in the ...

  • Jun 18, 08:00 AM | The Plain Dealer

    Members Only City Posts Eviction Notices on Homes That Are Now Lead-Free

    The city, after years of reluctance to post state-man-dated warnings and vacate homes with lingering lead hazards that poisoned children, now has ordered occupants to leave dozens of homes it helped to remediate with federal money. City health workers started to traverse neighborhoods earlier this month to post 340 of the red-and-white warning placards. Some residents knew they eventually ...

  • Jun 18, 02:45 AM | USA Today

    Members Only How Music Saved A City

    ASBURY PARK, N.J. – Amid the humid and turbulent summer of 1968, John Moor worked a summer job flipping burgers and hot dogs on the grill of Ducky's Luncheonette, one of the most popular stands at the boardwalk.About this projectIn a yearlong series of stories and videos, the USA TODAY NETWORK peels back the layers of a complex and textured year to reveal how, for good or ill, 1968 informs who ...

  • Jun 18, 01:31 AM | Hudson Reporter Publications

    How should Hoboken be developed?Residents give suggestions for zoning changes

    Thirty-five residents attended a hearing on Monday to determine how the city should be developed over the next decade or so, including zoning laws changes and capital improvements. Twelve of those people spoke at the meeting, held at the Multi Service Center on Grand Street, offering suggestions ranging from more one-bedroom units to more public bike racks. The suggestions will help shape the ...

  • Jun 17, 06:17 PM | The Advocate

    Growth in New Orleans home prices may force out longtime residents, study says

    June 18--The New Orleans housing market is strengthening, with home prices climbing in most neighborhoods and the number of vacant or blighted properties shrinking, according to a new analysis. But some neighborhoods have not kept up with the city's overall progress. In others, values have accelerated so quickly that longtime residents are at risk of being priced out. And a family of four ...

  • Jun 17, 02:31 PM | Dayton Daily News

    Miamisburg could see its largest housing project in years, the next step for the growing Austin area

    June 17--An annexation deal for 41 acres about a mile from a growing Interstate 75 interchange may bring more than 100 new homes to Miamisburg and additional tax revenue for Miami Twp. A city official called it a fair deal that shows the "good relationship" between the two jurisdictions, one that allows Inverness Homes to build "north of 100" homes, the largest such city project in years. A ...

  • Jun 17, 11:00 AM | Bristol Herald Courier

    After struggling for years, Bristol, Virginia's economic outlook appears brighter

    BRISTOL, Va. - The dark cloud hovering over Bristol, Virginia, may ultimately reveal a silver lining. After years of struggling to retain employers, recruit meaningful industry and wager its future on a shaky-at-best retail center, the city's economic development tide may be turning. And current city leaders say they are preparing to take advantage of any favorable winds that blow their way. ...

  • Jun 17, 10:56 AM | Associated Press

    Members Only Community fights for park, gardens proposed for development

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Dezmond Robertson, a 14-year-old living at Edgehill Apartments public housing, spends much of his free time riding bikes and playing with friends in the Edgehill Community Memorial Park, a wide-open green space next door. But the city-owned park, community gardens and former Murrell School are slated to be sold off to a developer who would likely use it for dense ...

  • Jun 17, 09:55 AM | Oregonian

    Members Only Southwest Corridor transit plan takes shape

    The Portland area’s next light-rail line could be a 12-mile meandering route that planners say could transport about 43,000 people a day between downtown and Bridgeport Village in about a half hour. The so-called Southwest Corridor has been on planners’ mind since at least 2009, but Metro and TriMet recently released the most detailed route yet for the estimated $2.6 billion to $2.9 billion ...

  • Jun 17, 09:55 AM | Oregonian

    Members Only Never a homeless camp, now a question mark

    Portland’s elected leaders did everything in their power to move the city’s most famous homeless camp to a vacant Central Eastside industrial lot more than three years ago. The city spent about $1.1 million to purchase the land, clean it up, and buy mobile showers to place on the oddly shaped site to make it more habitable. Then the state Land Use Board of Appeals blocked the move in August ...

  • Jun 17, 03:01 AM | The Boston Globe

    Members Only Fate of Quincy housing proposal in hands of state appeals panel

    Developers hoping to build a 40-unit housing development near the Wollaston MBTA station in Quincy are waiting on a decision from the state’s Housing Appeals Committee, possibly this summer, to find out if they can move forward. The developer, B & D Property Management, wants to tear down buildings it owns on the southeast corner of Old Colony and Warren avenues and replace them with one ...

  • Jun 17, 02:33 AM | The Day

    Leaving the 'lost city': Life after the high-rises

    June 17--NEW LONDON -- For a stay-at-home mother with a young son with health issues, Jeanne Ward said the options for subsidized housing are extremely limited. It's the reason Ward, a mother of four, said that the Thames River Apartments on Crystal Avenue, despite being situated smack in the middle of an industrial area and near a transfer station, appeared to be her best option. She hadn't ...

  • Jun 15, 09:38 AM | Los Angeles Times

    Members Only To Save CBS Television City, L.A. Might Have to Allow Development Around the Landmark

    June 15--For generations, CBS Television City has served as a stage for some of TV's most legendary moments. "The Jack Benny Program," The Carol Burnett Show" and "The Price Is Right" were filmed there, and such stars as Elvis Presley, Bob Hope and Jack Benny performed. But for all of that Hollywood history, Television City's future remains in flux in a city where property values are ...

  • Jun 15, 01:52 PM | National Real Estate Investor

    Why Multi-Story Industrial Assets Might Be in the Future for Dense U.S. Cities

    Multi-story warehouses are already common in Asia, but the concept is now taking off in supply-constrained American cities. Four multilevel projects are currently under construction or will soon break ground in Seattle, San Francisco and New York City, and many more planned projects will be announced in the coming months, according to Rob Kossar, vice chairman and head of the Northeast ...

  • Jun 15, 10:04 AM | New York Times Online

    Members Only Big City: New York City’s Worst Landlord? It Might Be the City

    The sound system of the current news cycle blares so loudly and cacophonously that it is easy for the urgent messages of a local story to go unheard, for the national audience to miss any opportunities to listen. But the crisis surrounding New York City’s public housing system, outlined in condemning detail in a recent investigation by federal prosecutors, has broad resonance for what it ...

  • Jun 15, 01:17 PM | Contra Costa Times

    California Considers New Bill to Speed Housing for the Homeless

    June 15--As it fought to block a large development for the chronically homeless, one neighborhood association created an elaborate, 100-page presentation to make its case to city officials. A line halfway through captures the Catch-22 of California's growing humanitarian crisis. "This facility is wrong for our neighborhoods," it reads, "but we support helping our homeless population." ...

  • Jun 15, 10:44 AM | Grand Rapids Press

    Members Only Grand Rapids Marijuana Proposal Would Allow Up to 43 Facilities

    City commissioners are moving the more restrictive of two proposals governing medical marijuana facilities onto the public-discussion phase. On a split vote Tuesday morning, the Grand Rapids City Commission decided to seek public input based on the framework in a proposal from the Grand Rapids planning department that would allow up to 43 medical marijuana facilities, at least 100 less than a ...

  • Jun 15, 06:18 AM | Tampa Bay Times

    Members Only Extending Airport Runway Could Benefit Innovation District Takeoff

    June 15--ST. PETERSBURG -- Albert Whitted Airport wants to extend its main runway. But what would benefit the airport could also benefit the St. Pete Innovation District. Moving the runway would ease building restrictions around the airport, allowing the University of South Florida St. Petersburg and other entities in the city's education, marine science and medical hub to build higher. USFSP ...

  • Jun 15, 08:34 AM | Detroit Free Press

    Detroit Train Station is City's Biggest Comeback Moment Yet

    June 15--Trying to sum up the significance of Ford's plans for the Michigan Central Station, a quote by Winston Churchill seems apt. "Now, this is not the end," Churchill said of an early Allied victory in World War II. "It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning." That's what Ford taking on the old train station means for Detroit. Years of hard work ...

  • Jun 15, 05:49 AM | Alabama Media Group

    Members Only Could Sewage Sludge Train Return to Alabama? Residents Near Landfill Concerned

    June 15--The last poop train headed for a landfill in Adamsville cleared the tracks in April, but many who live near the landfill are worried the shipments might resume once the public outcry dies down. More than 100 people attended a town hall meeting Thursday night at the House of Prayer Outreach Faith Church in Adamsville to discuss the situation, as some who live near the Big Sky Landfill ...

  • Jun 15, 05:16 AM | Patriot-News

    Members Only Harrisburg Buying Last of Properties Affected by Sinkhole; Area to Be Turned into Green Space

    As Harrisburg continues to buy properties affected by a sinkhole on a city street, a deadline is approaching for homeowners who wish to participate in the buyout program. According to city officials, Harrisburg has acquired 39 of the 53 properties on South 14th Street affected by the sinkhole that developed in March 2014. In a partnership with the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency and ...

  • Jun 15, 06:25 AM | US Official News

    Members Only Rhode Island Joins Coalition in Suing EPA Over Failure to Enforce a Critical Landfill Methane Regulation.

    Providence: Department of Plantations, The state of Rhode Island has issued the following news release: Attorney General Peter F. Kilmartin today joined a coalition of seven Attorneys General and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) in filing a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental ...

  • Jun 15, 08:13 AM | San Gabriel Valley Tribune

    Members Only Baldwin Park’s lone marijuana distributor gets 20-year, not lifetime, deal

    The Baldwin Park Planning Commission approved a 20-year development agreement, which was initially billed as a lifetime deal, for the city’s lone marijuana distributor, Rukli Inc.The agreement was first described in a city staff report as a lifetime agreement for Rukli’s second location at 4150 Puente Ave., but city Community Development Director Gus Romo issued a corrected version Wednesday ...

  • Jun 15, 05:17 AM | Penn Trafford Star

    Fracking dispute now up to judge

    The fate of fracking in Penn Township is in a judge’s hands after four days of testimony featuring more than 20 witnesses and more than 100 documents presented as evidence. Local activist group Protect PT challenged the township’s mineral extraction overlay in court before Westmoreland County Judge Harry F. Smail. The overlay allows unconventional gas well drilling in rural and industrial ...

  • Jun 15, 04:06 AM | Pioneer Press Newspapers

    Park Ridge to consider allowing tattoo businesses for the first time

    June 15--Is Park Ridge ready to allow tattooing within its borders? It's a question elected officials are expected to tackle next month when a recommendation to permit businesses that offer cosmetic tattooing as well as "body art" tattoos goes before the City Council for action. The Park Ridge Planning and Zoning Commission on June 12 reviewed a proposal from the City Council to allow cosmetic ...

  • Jun 15, 03:18 AM | Governance, Risk & Compliance Monitor Worldwide

    Hawley sues St. Louis developer, alleges tax credit fraud

    One day after St. Louis officials announced plans to cut ties developer Paul McKee over a massive but long-stalled project in an impoverished area, Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley has filed suit against the same developer. The suit filed Wednesday says McKees company, Northside Regeneration LLC , received $4.5 million in state tax credits but failed to complete the purchase of more than ...

  • Jun 15, 03:16 AM | Finance & Commerce

    United has backup hotel plan for Minneapolis tower

    United Properties is talking with another luxury hotel for its downtown Minneapolis “Gateway” tower, signaling that either a Ritz-Carlton or a Fairmont could enter the Twin Cities, according to one hotel market expert. Minneapolis-basedUnited Propertieshas been negotiating primarily with the Four Seasons hotel chain to put as many as 280 rooms on 10 floors in the36-story tower at 30 S. Third ...

  • Jun 15, 02:04 AM | Yakima Herald-Republic

    A bridge to Selah? $30 million I-82 project being considered

    June 15--SELAH, Wash. -- Each day, 30,000 cars and trucks travel Selah's South First Street on the way to or from the Interstate 82 interchange. For most drivers, it's the only practical way in or out of the city. But it can be frustrating, especially during rush hour when traffic gets heavy. The only other option is an exit near the Yakima Training Center -- more than 3.5 miles from the ...

  • Jun 15, 12:46 AM | Palo Alto Daily News

    San Mateo County: Flood Park redesign worries nearby residents

    June 15--Once they're done, the new sports fields being developed at Flood Park in Menlo Park should be off-limits between 4 and 6 p.m. weekdays, according to neighbors who have signed petitions seeking such a restriction. San Mateo County has been working to revamp the park, which is tucked along Bay Road, to help address a shortage of county fields for recreational activities. The park's ...

  • Jun 14, 10:46 PM | Alabama Media Group

    Members Only $30 million Hilton hotel coming to downtown Huntsville

    June 15--A new hotel is coming to downtown Huntsville. The city council at Thursday night's meeting unanimously approved a project development agreement to bring a Curio by Hilton hotel that will be constructed near the courthouse square. Shane Davis, director of economic and urban development for the city, said in a brief presentation to the council that the hotel will be located at 106 ...

  • Jun 14, 10:26 PM | The Herald-Tribune

    North Port approves water park, aims to land first hotel since 1973

    June 14--NORTH PORT -- North Port city commissioners have approved the construction contract for the North Port Aquatic Center at Butler Park and took steps to ease the way for the construction of the first new hotel in North Port since 1973. Both items have been long-awaited by the residents of Sarasota's largest municipality. Surprise low-bidder Recreational Design & Construction, Inc., of ...

  • Jun 14, 10:03 PM | Register-Guard

    Hilton Eugene hotel sells for nearly $80 million

    June 14--Hilton Eugene's days as a Hilton are numbered. A Chicago investment firm has purchased the iconic downtown Eugene hotel for $79.7 million, in one of the largest real estate deals by dollar value in Lane County history. AJ Capital Partners bought the Hilton Eugene from Ohio-based Rockbridge Capital, according to a deed filed in Lane County this week. The firm took out a $56.8 million ...

  • Jun 14, 09:19 PM | Associated Press

    Bill blocking future hog farm nuisance suits finalized

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina legislators have finalized tougher restrictions upon neighbors of hog farms seeking to sue for damages because of the stench and other nuisances coming from industrial-scale livestock operations. The state Senate agreed Thursday night by a 32-9 vote to accept House changes to legislation spurred on by the agribusiness industry following the results of the ...

  • Jun 14, 09:09 PM | San Diego Union-Tribune

    EDITORIAL: San Diego mayor's short-term rental plan is a promising compromise

    June 14--After years of fighting over how to regulate short-term vacation rentals in San Diego, there's reason to hope an end -- or at least a truce -- may be near. The proposal unveiled Thursday by Mayor Kevin Faulconer appears to be a fair compromise that has potential to win a majority of the votes on a City Council that has been deeply divided on the issue. The plan would allow homeowners ...

  • Jun 14, 09:04 PM | Florida Times-Union

    Julington-Durbin land swap plan draws more critics

    June 15--A conservation nonprofit set up by the administration of former Jacksonville Mayor John Delaney on Thursday denounced a plan that Delaney supports to allow development in part of the Julington-Durbin Preserve. The board of the Timucuan Parks Foundation asked in a resolution that Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinet, as well as the St. Johns River Water Management District's governing ...

  • Jun 15, 03:01 AM | The Boston Globe

    Members Only City Tries to Aid Buildings Against Climate Change

    Memories of the storm last winter that flooded parts of downtown Boston are still fresh at City Hall. Now, the Walsh administration is pushing developers to make their buildings better able to withstand another watery apocalypse. The Boston Planning & Development Agency on Thursday approved new rules to make big buildings more resilient to the effects of climate change. City officials hope the ...