August/September 2011


This issue of Planning explores the concept of "Sustaining Places." The articles on aging in place and affordable housing explain how places can sustain people, while the stories on Reston and other new towns show how planning can create — and sustain — communities. An upbeat piece on greenways states outright that planning should start with green elements. More challenging are the stories on energy. They ask whether we are prepared for the long haul — because no energy source is entirely clean, even the renewable ones.

Planning coverHere's to Long Life

Aging-in-place programs are changing entire communities, says Adam Regn Arvidson. With a sidebar on the ADA by Stephen Carter-Novotni.

A New Day at Sunrise

In Charlottesville, Virginia, Habitat for Humanity carves a neighborhood out of a trailer court — but keeps affordable housing in the mix. By Daniel Nairn.

Reston Revisited

John Clark describes how the famous new town is still evolving.

No Small Plans

Suzanne Sutro Rhees relates the stories of three master planned communities that have come of age.

Putting Greenways First

Randall Arendt explains how to create healthy and connected communities — in this month's Planning Practice.

Kinder Coal?

Like it or lump it, it's the nation's most abundant energy source, and now other countries covet it. Allen Best takes a trip to Wyoming.

Sidebar: It's Everywhere

El Dorado North

Canada enjoys the upside — and copes with the downside — of its remarkable oil boom. Andrew Nikiforuk asks how the mining region can be sustained.


A regular column by CEO Paul Farmer.


Lizard listing, Utah TOD.

Legal News

City's mistake, emissions credits.

By the Numbers

Statistics in the news, compiled by APA's Research Department. This month: energy.

Ever Green

Tim Beatley reconsiders favelas.


Ports reports, high-speed rail.

Planners Library

Justice first, economy development.


New reports, blogs, videos, etc.


Ground Zero a decade later.

Cover art: Green Lane, Baldwin Park, Florida. Photo by Randall Arendt.