Planning for Street Connectivity (PAS 515)

Getting From Here to There

By Susan Handy, Robert Paterson, Kent Butler

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Planning for Street Connectivity discusses a concept that has met with varied receptions in communities. Some quietly accept it; others fight it vigorously. Proponents point out numerous benefits. These include: a decrease of traffic on arterial streets; more continuous and direct routes that encourage travel by walking and bicycling; greater access and quicker response times for emergency vehi...

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Product Details

Page Count
95
Date Published
June 1, 2003
ISBN
978-1-884829-86-4
Format
Paperback
Publisher
APA Planning Advisory Service

About the Authors

Susan Handy

Robert Paterson

Kent Butler

Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. History of street patterns and standards • The rectilinear grid • Curvilinear streets • The street hierarachy • Standards • Implications

Chapter 2. The debate • Decrease traffic on arterial streets • Facilitate nonmotorized travel • Providing greater emergency access and improving service efficiency • The role of street widths • Conclusions

Chapter 3. Street connectivity in practice • Metro, regional government for the Portland, Oregon area • Portland, Oregon • Beaverton, Oregon • Eugene, Oregon • Fort Collins, Colorado • Boulder, Colorado • Cary, North Carolina • Huntersville, North Carolina • Cornelius, North Carolina • Conover, North Carolina • Middletown, Delaware • Orlando, Florida ̺ Summary

Chapter 4. Context-sensitive street connectivity:a tale of two cities • Raleigh, North Carolina • Austin, Texas • Comparing the cases

Afterword:more to think about

Appendix A: List of references
Appendix B: Street connectivity codes • Metro regional government for Portland, Oregon area • Portland, Oregon • Beaverton, Oregon • Fort Collins, Colorado • Cary, North Carolina • Huntersville, North Carolina • Cornelius, North Carolina • Raleigh, North Carolina • Orland, Florida