Crime and Planning

Building Socially Sustainable Communities

By Derek Paulsen

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Is your community designed for crime — and are planners unwitting accomplices?

Most planners agree that the built environment can aid criminal activity or obstruct it. But few address community crime effectively in their plans. Why the disconnect? Planners, says author Derek J. Paulsen, underestimate their power to fight crime. Some widely used planning models, such as permeable street...

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Product Details

Page Count
205
Date Published
Nov. 1, 2012
ISBN
978-1-439871-66-9
Format
Paperback
Publisher
APA Planners Press with CRC Press

About the Authors

Derek Paulsen

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Introduction
Why a Disconnect
Crime, Planning, and Sustainability
Structure of This Book

Chapter 2: A Brief Overview of Crime and Crime Issues
Major Issues in Crime and Urban Planning
Connectivity
Mixed Land Use
Zoning
Transit-Oriented Development
Parks, Pedestrian Trails, and Greenways
Conclusion

Chapter 3: Redefining Sustainability
Redefining and Refocusing Sustainable Communities

Chapter 4: Integrating Crime Prevention Into a Socially Sustainable Planning Program
Current Crime Prevention-Planning Programs
Integrating Crime Into the Everyday Planning Process
Cooperation
Efficient and Consistent Process
Participation
Context
Elimination of Opportunities
Balance
Tools for Understanding Context
The Neighborhood Impact Statement Model
Design Guidance
Transit-Oriented Developments
Parks, Pedestrian Trails, and Greenways
Conclusion

Chapter 5: Planning Policy and Socially Sustainable Communities
Smart Growth
Form-Based Codes
Suburban Retrofitting
Conclusion

Chapter 6: Case Studies
Residential Neighborhood Case Study
Housing Street Network
Land Use and Zoning
Patterns
Retail District Case Study

Appendix A: Steps to Integrate Crime Prevention and Planning

Appendix B: Design Guides

Reviews

"This is a vital addition to the planner's toolbox that provides concrete methods and practices for reducing the potential for crime. Instead of relying on topical applications (e.g. surveillance cameras, security personnel), Derek Paulsen argues that urban design is the most germane tool for reducing opportunities for crime."
—Jeremy Nemeth, University of Colorado–Denver