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Colorado Chapter

$96.00 Member Price

DEEP DIVE - Exploratory Scenario Planning and Emerging Tools

Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 9:00amMany communities are turning to exploratory scenario planning. It’s a powerful tool for developing robust, resilient policies to prepare for whatever shape the future ultimately takes. Explore trends, lessons learned, best practices, and methods for scenario planning. Learn how scenario planning has played out from the intermountain west to communities affected by Hurricane Sandy. Finally, see how change and alternative futures fit into your long-and short range planning — and what they mean for planning practice.

$0.00

CM | 2.75

2014 APA Colorado Annual Conference

Early Registration ends on September 15, 2014. All registration changes and cancellations must be received by e-mail to confregistration@planning.org by September 15, 2014 to be eligible for a refund. There is a $50 ($35 for students) processing fee for any cancellation and a $25 change order processing fee.

$999.00

Flood Recovery Workshop: : Water Over the Bridge: Colorado Disaster Recovery and the Planners Role

Friday, October 03, 2014, 1:45pmIn 2013, Colorado experienced epic flooding. Recovery in Boulder County, including in the devastated communities of Jamestown and Lyons, is still underway. Efforts have moved from emergency response to addressing short-term needs to developing longer-term recovery plans. Come learn about the county’s interdisciplinary and collaborative response to flood recovery. Wrap up with perspectives from the federal, state, and local levels that will emphasize the importance of sustainability and resiliency in recovery planning. Learning Objectives: 1. Approach to short-term local emergency response and community recovery priorities; 2. Approach to multijurisdictional recovery planning along creek and road corridors; 3. Community-based process for housing recovery; 4.Tools developed for rebuilding in hazard areas and floodplain management; 5. Tips for using federal recovery funds to protect and rebuild private infrastructure Outline: One Flood, Eight Watersheds, and Many Roads: This segment will introduce the September 2013 flood in Boulder Co., including facts and figures on infrastructure and waterways damage. It will introduce the planning themes (internal organizational capacity, collaboration, inter-agency coordination, public engagement)that govern many post-flood programs developed by the county, including comprehensive creek master planning; high hazard home demolition and hazardous debris removal; and infrastructure rebuilding. Permitting the Recovery from a 1,000 Year Rain Event: This segment will provide an overview of issues and challenges for rebuilding, including tools developed for the interim response such as the temporary building permit moratorium; new “hazard mitigation review” process; and interim permits. It will address other recovery land use needs, such as housing and debris drop-off sites and will contrast the county’s experiences with fire and flood recovery. Flood Replacement Housing in Boulder County: This segment will describe the community-based process for housing recovery in Lyons and Jamestown. Topics include types of replacement housing and location considerations. It will describe the decision-making process, which involved multiple interest groups with competing and complementary goals. The role that funding sources played in driving the decision-making process will be highlighted. Rebuilding More Resiliently Wrap-Up: This segment will provide perspectives from federal, state, and local agencies on the importance of sustainability and resiliency in recovery planning. As a summary to the previous segments, it will also highlight lessons learned and include views from local leadership on challenges and opportunities for emergency response, immediate recovery, and long-term flood recovery planning. Methodologies: “Colorado Disaster Recovery and the Planner’s Role” will be presented in four segments, with segment one introducing the planning themes and segment four summarizing and applying them as lessons learned. Each segment will use a panel discussion format, including a moderator and 2-3 other panelists. CM Criteria: •Planning principles will be presented in the first presentation and summarized and applied in the fourth presentation; •Planning frameworks and approaches will be described and discussed in the first and third presentations; •Planning tools will be identified and discussed in the first, second, and third presentations; and •All 4 presentations will identify key planning issues, challenges, and ways that challenges were addressed. All of the presentations are intended to describe diverse experiences and share information about flood recovery across multiple disciplines and roles, thereby avoiding the promotion or bias toward any one idea, approach, or outcome. Each presentation will include its educational objective. For the delivery of CM activities: • All moderators and panel members have direct experience and expertise, as community or flood recovery officials or program leaders,

$0.00

CM | 3.0

Growing Solar in Colorado: Creating and enhancing solar garden initiatives

Wednesday, October 01, 2014, 3:15pm Is your community ready to take advantage of Colorado’s abundant sunshine, recently passed Solar Garden legislation, and financial incentives? Planners have a need to learn how to align solar policies and regulations. This session instructs planners on how to integrate solar into adopted plans, develop zoning strategies, and partner with the solar industry to understand facility design and construction. Learning Objectives: 1. Best Practices for protecting solar access and regulate solar facilities of varied scales. 2. Site selection criteria for utility-scale solar facilities. 3. How the City of Fort Collins electric utility has developed a solar feed-in-tariff. 4. Craft solar policies for comprehensive plans and special area plans. Outline: 1. Panel Introduction 2. Impetus of increased Solar Opportunities throughout Colorado a. Federal: Tax Incentives b. State: The Solar Garden Act c. Local: Initiatives in several municipalities 3. Solar as an element of adopted Plans a. Solar Policy at the Community and Neighborhood Scale b. Best practice examples from across the country 4. Protecting Solar Access a. What we have learned over the past 25 years b. Solar Access best practices-some examples 5. The Fort Collins Experience a. Past Fort Collins policies and regulations governing solar access and siting b. Adoption of a solar Feed-in-Tariff (FIT) and Solar Power Purchase Program c. Recently adopted Fort Collins Solar Code i. Objectives ii. Code Language iii. Lesson’s learned 6. Siting Solar Facilities from the Solar Installer’s Perspective a. Site attributes for utility-scale solar facilities b. How the public sector can help facilitate solar facility siting 7. Summary Comments 8. Question and Answer Period CM Criteria: Session content will prepare Colorado planners for new solar facilities that will soon become more common in their communities. Presented Information will be unbiased, and comes from more than 30 years’ experience from practitioners steeped in the nuances of the solar industry. All three presenters can be considered experts in their respective public and private sector practices. Attendance from this session will be recorded and the content evaluated by the panel prior to the session. System moderator and presenter, Cameron Gloss, will be the point of contact.

$0.00

CM | 1.5

Thursday Evening Reception Guest Ticket

Thursday, October 02, 2014, 6:00pmWill be held at Exploration Place.

$29.00

The RLUIPA Reader

2009 Paperback
A discussion of religion, land use, and property rights.

$79.95

Thursday Breakfast and Keynote

Thursday, October 02, 2014, 7:30am

$0.00

Wednesday Lunch and Opening Plenary

Wednesday, October 01, 2014, 12:00pm

$0.00

Friday Lunch and Closing Plenary

Friday, October 03, 2014, 12:00pm

$0.00

Thursday Evening Reception Complimentary Ticket

Thursday, October 02, 2014, 6:00pmWill be held at Exploration Place.

$0.00

Planning in the Patch

Friday, October 03, 2014, 10:15amThere is an oil and gas boom in Weld County and public and private sector planners working in the area are learning how best to work with the industry while protecting the health, safety and welfare of the citizens. In this session, planners will help explain the industry, why they have found it is in the best interests of the citizens of the County, State and Nation to work with the industry, and how they are doing it. Learning Objectives: 1. Understanding the oil and gas industry. 2. How to mitigate land use impacts related to oil and gas development. 3. Considerations when Updating Land Use Codes/Regulations. 4. Understanding oil and gas initiatives on the 2014 ballot. Outline: Understanding the Oil and Gas Industry I. Locating the oil and gas resource in Colorado II. Surface rights vs. mineral rights – what Colorado law says III. Energy sources – why oil and gas is needed in addition to renewable energy sources IV. Changes in technology that have changed the industry V. What is fracking and how does it work VI. How the oil and gas industry impacts Colorado A. Economy B. Environment C. Provision of public services How to mitigate land use impacts related to oil and gas development. I. Identifying typical impacts related to oil and gas II. Brief overview of County process 1. Use by Right (UBR) - examples of UBR operations and facilities 2. Use by Special Review (USR) - examples of USR operations and facilities III. Mitigation techniques A. UBR Best Management Practices (BMP) 1. COGCC (setbacks, buffering, emissions and spill reporting, containment) 2. County (setbacks, water testing, noise testing) B. USR - County Regs (buffering, landscaping techniques, lighting, noise, traffic and access) C. LGD (Local Government Designee) 1. Permitting and reporting requirements 2. Public feedback and forums IV. Horizontal drilling limits surface impacts A. Reduction in vertical wells and pad consolidation B. Respecting surface uses Considerations When Updating Land Use Codes/Regulations I. Communication is key. A. Governmental entities and the oil and gas industry should communicate prior to implementation of land use codes and regulations. B. Essential to select the best placement for wells and related equipment. II. Need for speed! A. Pre-application conferences with the surface owner, mineral interest and municipality. B. Create regulations that do not overburden the application process. III. Don’t recreate the wheel. A. Draw from municipal codes on oil and gas that have already been created. B. DOLA has a sample oil and gas code. IV. Don’t need to prevent the oil and gas industry from coming in. A. Consider an update to the zoning code to allow oil and gas operations in appropriate locations. B. Buffer or otherwise take care of potential impacts (e.g. dust, sound, traffic, lights). Understanding Oil and Gas Initiatives on the Ballot I. 2014 ballot initiatives related to oil and gas A. What it will mean to communities if the ballot initiatives pass B. What will mean to communities if the ballot initiatives fail CM Criteria: The criteria for CM Approval are met as follows: 1. Oil and gas development is one of the most significant land use issues facing many planners in Colorado. Weld County is the most impacted County in the State and planners working in the County have learned how to work with the industry. It is beneficial to share that knowledge with planners from around the State. 2. All four presenters are planners or professionals who are working on oil and gas related issues and are therefore experts experts on the subject matter. The presentation and question and answer period are anticipated to take 90 minutes so the session will be worth 1.5 CM. 3. We anticipate that APA Colorado will have a system in place for recording attendance and evaluating content. Pam Hora, AICP is the point of contact for this session.

$0.00

CM | 1.5

The Right Special District for Your Community

Friday, October 03, 2014, 8:30amWhy are so many Colorado communities forming business improvement and special districts lately? Colorado has a wide variety of district types (BIDs, SIDs, GIDs, URAs, DDAs) designed to accomplish different goals. In this fast-paced, interactive session, learn how to match community needs with the right tool to support priorities and implementation. Understand the differences in legal requirements and formation steps under Colorado law. Learning Objectives: 1. The types of districts utilized most often in Colorado. 2. The different purposes of the major district types. 3. National and statewide trends that are driving Colorado localities to explore district formation. 4. Legal aspects of district formation and renewal. Outline: The format of this session is based on the longest running stage play in Chicago, ‘Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind.’ In the session the presenters cover 30 topics in 90 minutes, with the audience (by shouting the number of the topic) picking the order of what is presented from a menu of numbered choices handed out at the start of the presentation. Topics that will be covered for certain include: 1. Describe the wide variety of districts BID GID SID URA DDA 2. Legal purposes and requirements for each major district type 3. Legal aspects and steps for formation 4. 2014 changes to Colorado districts laws 5. Trends – legal and other – that are driving the current wave of district formations 6. Lessons from Practice: how to match community needs with the right district 7. Lessons from Practice: Layering multiple tools and options CM Critera: The educational purpose is to educate planners about district types and formations as allowed under Colorado law. District formation is often looked to by planners as a plan implementation tool. As more communities in Colorado seek locally-generated financing streams, planners can benefit from understanding the legal differences in purpose and formation requirements among types of districts. Rick Kron is the acknowledged legal expert in Colorado district formation, as evidenced by his authorship of the chapter on that Topic in the authoritative, Colorado Planning & Land Use Law. Anna Jones has practitioner experience assisting dozens of communities to select the best fitting district and guiding them through the district formation process.

$0.00

CM | 1.5

AICP Exam Workshop: AICP and ME: Exam Crunch Time

Friday, October 03, 2014, 1:45pmThe AICP fall exam is just around the corner. This year’s test has new questions, but the content is still the same. Experts from planning fields will give you the crash course you need to make your exam taking successful.

$0.00

Thursday Awards Reception Additional Ticket

Thursday, October 02, 2014, 5:00pm It’s time for the 2014 APA Colorado Awards ceremony. Come congratulate your colleagues as they accept their awards for outstanding planning projects in our state. A short video of all the winners will be presented while you enjoy appetizers and drinks at the view inspiring Butte 66.

$45.00

Water Roundtable: Planning on Water

Thursday, October 02, 2014, 12:00pmColorado is currently drafting the Colorado Water Plan to address future water supply needs around the state. How can local land use planning and regulation further water conservation objectives s in the face of increased development pressure? Is it time to put water use/water conservations in community master plans? Join in a roundtable discussion of how local land use planning and regulation and water planning fit together. WORK SESSION to brainstorm land use planning practices and implementing regulations that work to achieve water conservation.

$0.00

Thursday Awards Reception Complimentary Ticket

Thursday, October 02, 2014, 5:00pm It’s time for the 2014 APA Colorado Awards ceremony. Come congratulate your colleagues as they accept their awards for outstanding planning projects in our state. A short video of all the winners will be presented while you enjoy appetizers and drinks at the view inspiring Butte 66.

$0.00

Sustainable Breck

Friday, October 03, 2014, 1:45pmLearn about sustainability efforts in Breckenridge, one of Colorado’s premier ski towns. The session will explore the extensive public process that led to the development of the SustainableBreck Plan and then will focus on some of the sustainability initiatives that the Town has undertaken to implement the plan. Learning Objectives: 1. Steps that led to a successful multi-pronged public engagement process 2. Implementation of the Town’s disposable bag fee 3. The Plan’s unique monitoring elements and annual reports 4. A broadened sense of what “sustainability” entails Outline: We intend to provide some background that led up to the initiation of the plan development. Then highlight some of the steps we took to engage the public in the plan process. Key issues and actions will be highlighted. We will also describe our SustainableBreck indicators—a system for monitoring the Plan over time. Next we will outline a couple case examples of implementation: The Town’s disposable bag fee and reusable bag program; and the Town’s SustainableBreck Business certification program. If time allows, we will also touch on the Town’s community solar gardens and other implementation measures. CM Criteria: 1.The session will a) be directly planning related—the Sustainable Breck Plan is a planning document adopted in 2011 by the Town of Breckenridge after an extensive public engagement process; b) informational will be shared in an objective and non-biased manner; c) the session is intended to educate attendees on organizational logistics associated with developing a plan with a large public engagement component and will provide learning opportunities related to implementation of the plan. 2. a) The session will be led by two planners that have years of experience in governmental planning and in comprehensive planning efforts; b) the discussion will focus on the methodical approach used to develop and then implement the SustainableBreck Plan; c) no proprietary information will be included; d) we intend to use the time allotted productively, with probably 70-75 minutes of presentation and a 15-20 minutes question and answer period. 3. a) and b) we assume these are responsibilities of APA staff but will be glad to assist as needed.

$0.00

CM | 1.5

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