Tuesdays at APA

Join APA in Washington, D.C., each month for this after-work lecture and discussion series.

Events are:

  • Free
  • Open to APA members and nonmembers
  • Held at APA's Washington, D.C., office: 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 750 West
  • Given by practicing planners, researchers, and professionals from allied fields
  • Focused on innovative ideas and concepts, or project presentations

Join in-person or access podcasts from past Tuesdays at APA programs.


Upcoming Programs

Dangerous By Design

May 23, 2017 • 5:30 p.m. ET

Emiko Atherton, director of the National Complete Streets Coalition, will discuss findings and implications from the recently released Dangerous by Design 2016 report.

Attendees will learn which areas of the country are leading in pedestrian safety, what impacts roadway design has on vulnerable populations, and what steps communities can take to work toward implementing a Complete Streets design approach.

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Speaker

Emiko Atherton

Emiko Atherton is the director of the National Complete Streets Coalition, a program of Smart Growth America, where she oversees the Coalition’s federal advocacy, communications, research, and technical assistance programs. Atherton has used her expertise in transportation policy, public health, land use, economic development, and legislation to consult with communities across the United States on how to create better transportation networks. She is an international voice on complete streets and has spoken to audiences across the country about the value this approach. Before joining the coalition, Atherton served as chief of staff for a King County councilmember in Washington State. In that role, she worked closely with local and state governments, federal agencies, the U.S. Congress, and MPOs on policy development and implementation, coalition building, and transportation planning. Atherton received her master’s in public administration from Evans School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Washington.

One Water: Coordination Efforts for Sustainable Communities

June 20, 2017 • 5:30 p.m. ET

Recognizing that all water has value, One Water is a concept that “integrates the planning and management of water supply, wastewater, and stormwater systems in a way that minimizes the impact on the environment and maximizes the contribution to social and economic vitality.” The shift to One Water parallels both the rise of the “Utility of the Future” in the wastewater sector and forges new partnerships between the water sector and other sectors.

Where is coordination taking place and how can planners be involved? How can it increase resilience and help us build more sustainable communities?

This session will provide a brief overview of One Water management and discuss research efforts underway in the water/wastewater community to help communities move toward One Water. Topics include improving coordination between water managers and urban planners; incorporating non-potable onsite treatment into building design; and innovative stormwater solutions to achieve co-benefits in diversified water supplies, flooding mitigation, and increased community well-being. 

CM | 1.0

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Speaker

Katy Lackey

Katy Lackey is a research manager at the Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WE&RF). Her work focuses on climate change and resiliency planning, energy, decentralized (onsite) treatment systems, and integrated water management. Previously, she worked as a program coordinator for World Camp, Inc. in Ahmedabad, India, and Malawi, Africa. She directed outreach programs in primary schools and with nearby villages, increasing access to health and environmental education. This work led Lackey to a career in water — particularly, the intersection of gender, health issues (HIV/AIDS, malaria), access to natural resources, and the impact climate change has on resource management. Lackey serves on the executive board of the Women’s Aquatic Network in Washington, D.C. She holds a master's in International Affairs from American University, and a master's in Natural Resources and Sustainable Development from the UN-mandated University for Peace.